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Pastor's Monthly Message


Pastor's Monthly Message for December 2008

No Time for Panic

During the last months, we hear of financial meltdown, industries failing, foreclosures and a host of other threats. There are times when we don't know what our next move should be and there seems to be a time when organizations and individuals are driven to panic. When the situation is difficult and a quick response is called for, we all become very uneasy. We should like to turn and run. Gandhi once said, "Panic is the most demoralizing state anyone can be in".

Through the years people have panicked for many reasons and the results have usually been very negative. Panic is a sudden, overwhelming fear, once that makes us irrational and most of the time, irresponsible. We cannot think clear while in a state of panic.

To avoid the onset of this emotion, we must recognize some of the symptoms; a feeling of despair, the belief that there is no solution, and the conviction that we are alone without any help. Panic can occur suddenly, or it can build slowly and gradually erode common sense, leaving us stranded with our imagination running wild.

May of us still remember the panic created by Orson Wells, Ware of the Worlds - a great epic of fiction, but to many the fear it created was as real as if an invasion of the earth had actually taken place. When we don't have our facts straight, we lose contact with the world and panic sweeps in to control. True, a problem may exist, bu it is most often much less serious than we imagined. Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only to be understood.

Pastor's Monthly Message for July and August 2008

Aging

It takes a lot of trust in the Lord as we go through life. There are many myths about growing old. They fear it as a time when they will be alone, bored, useless or ill. But old age is not that way for most people. The majority of persons beyond retirement age consider life satisfying and definitely worth living.

Researchers find that old age doesn't bring many surprises. People who are well adjusted in middle age tend to be well adjusted during the golden years. And there is a certain exhilarating freedom that comes with the senior citizen status. It is no longer necessary to strive for professional recognition, These individuals have earned a chance to relax, to savor life, and to do some things they want to do.

Enduring to the end, as God instructed, does not mean simply lying back and doing nothing. It means continuing to set goals, to work, and to contribute insight, prospective and experience. A wise observer once said that to often in aging, people do things for the last time and not for the first time. If we reverse that process, that is, try it for the first time at whatever age, we will have an effective antidote against growing old.

Here are a few thoughts to ponder: First, make plans for the future-long-range, long-range goals along with plans for today and tomorrow. Second, exercise can accomplish wonders. And remember the heart, like the body, also needs exercise. There is practically nothing more stirring than two elderly people in love, each still finding in each other those qualities which were admired in youth. Third, as we grow older, we become aware of how little we know, and with this awareness comes again the child's sense we know, and with this awareness comes again the child's sense of wonder-but with increased power of judgment and discrimination.

Pastor's Monthly Message - May 2008

Just a Mother

What a mistake it is to think that motherhood is an outdated or menial task, or that being a mother is not prestigious. Common sense rejects this false notion: history contradicts it; and truth disproves it. And yet, how often have we heard this apologetic response, "I am just a mother" as if the title needed defending.

Just a Mother...

"My boy is not stupid", said one such mother when her son brought home a note from a teacher, saying her boy was too stupid to learn. "I will teach him myself",she said. She produced Thomas Alva Edison. Just a mother brought refinement and culture into a nineteenth-century peasant cottage in Poland, Madame Curie, Nobel Prize winner and benefactor of mankind was the result. "All that I am, or hope to be, I owe to my angel mother", concluded one man near the close of his life. A man who had spent his boyhood in a log cabin, and had gone to occupy this country's White House, and to save a nation, and emancipate people, Abraham Lincoln.

Just a Mother...

Men are what their mothers make them. Not governments, not schools, not churches, but mothers are the fundamental ARCHITECTS OF GREAT MEN AND GREAT WOMEN. To mothers alone is entrusted the awesome responsibility to train the mind of an Einstein, to light the poetic flame of a Longfellow, to instill the compassion of a Florence Nightingale, or to nurture the genius of Michelangelo. From wherever we stand, we look back toward the hazy dimness of our childhood whence we came, and with moist eyes, acknowledge the font of our learning and character: Our mothers. Just a mother acting confidently and responsibly in hr role as human engineer, who is un-fearful of ridicule, is unmindful of fame, and does what love bids will cast the shadow of her influence over the world.

- Pastor Hans Lillejord

Pastor's Monthly Message - February 2008

The Uncommon Value of the Common

Some of the things that we value most in life through we might not always realize it, are the most common. This fact prompted on author to say, "Genius is recognizing the uniqueness in the unimpressive. It is looking at a homely caterpillar, an ordinary egg and a selfish infant, and seeing a butterfly, an eagle or a saint." Well, that may be the essence of genius. It is the natural curiosity and imagination that makes a child stare at a bug or watch the clouds drift by. Little touches that are common to us all when we're young. Unfortunately, as we grow older, our world usually becomes more complicated, and in the process we lose sight of life's most valuable and lovely things.

Pastor's Monthly Message - September 2007

We Are What We Think


The words of Emerson suggest that there is something stronger than material force - something more than just what we can see and feel and smell and touch. Thoughts rub the world, indeed, mankind. "We are what we think" is a common saying. Thoughts, it seems, are the starting flare for all that ever has been.

Did not the creator make the mid the most complex and intricate part of this amazing machine we call a body? In fact, so complex is the mind that it alone can control the soul - even to the degree of eliminating pain, causing illness, telling us things are true when they are not - even to the point where we believe them.

Adaptation

Pastor's Monthly Message - May 2007

On the world's highest mountains there is a point beyond which no tree can grow. The air is too cool and the growing season too short to sustain a mighty tree. But htere is some plant life in the alpine meadows above the tree line: wildflowers especially adapted for the harsh conditions. Instead of being long-stemmed and large like the flowers lower on the mountain, they are tiny and hug the ground for warmth. Their growing season is short, and perhaps most interesting, some of the flowers face the rising sun in the morning and tun to follow its light all day, until when the sun sets, the flower faces west - a marvelous adaptation to a fierce environment. No longer-stemmed, large flower from the lower reaches could survive above the tree line.

Let Freedom Ring, August 1, 2006

The pride and faith citizens of the United States of America have in their country is particularly evident each July as flags are unflured and fireworks puncture the evening skies. It's a time when Americans contemplate their citizenship - a citizenship many people throughout the world would be honored to share.

The founding fathers of this country believed that the most important thing in the word is a government in which freedom and liberty of the individual is protected. They believed this freedom is basic to our individul development and happiness. They also believed that each person has an obligation to serve society, to assist in the machinery that helps guarantee our freedoms.

Do Not Be Afraid of the Dark - March 1, 2006

Wise and loving parents have often taught us not to fear the dark. Simply because our eyes do not perceive the familiar surroundings seen in the daylight is no reason to fear our path in taking an unexpected turn into uncertainty. And so it is with life.

Too many fear the future with apprehension, with a fear of facing the unknown, perhaps of something ominous awaiting them. Many even suggest the best of life is past, that they will never again experience the good times they once knew. But gratefully such has not been life's pattern. Reality is seldom as bad as our imagination fears.

The Best Part Of Life, February 1, 2006

When we were young, most of us were admonished by our parents to eat our vegetables before the desert. As adults, we are couseled to put business before pleasure. Most of our accomplishments follow this pattern. We put the time, the effort, the expense into a project, and then we reap the rewards and benefits. Those are the rules of the world, we are told. But sometimes life does not follow its own rules.

Sometimes it seems the best parts of life come first. Early on, we have a healthier challenge of youth. We have what seems like endless years to accomplish our wildest dreams. Nothing is beyond the realms of our aspirations. It is as though we are having our desert first in life.

Give What You Have, November 1

We have said in the past that none of us will pass through this life without affecting the lives of others, for no man or woman exists entirely unto themselves.

To some degree, we all depend upon one another. In fact, much of our own happiness is dependant upon others, and comes from those around us. But, interestingly enough, happiness is a result of what we give to our fellow man, not what we take. The most capable individual always seems to be the one most willing to give his time and talent to others.

We should all do well to follow one of John Wesley's simple rules of conduct for living.

12809 New Sweden Church Road
Manor, TX 78653
Phone: 512-281-0056

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Rev. Hans J. Lillejord, Pastor
Cell Phone: 512-947-9044

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